Fragrant sumac shrub

Gro-Low Sumac (Rhus aromatica

Rhus Typhina Tiger Eyes is a hardy and attractive dwarf form of stags horn Sumach, small and compact in habit. The deeply divided leaves are bright golden-yellow, turning many shades of orange and red before leaf fall in autumn.
Max Height 2m.
Max Spread 3m.
Flowers July to August.
Fruits August.
Full Sun.
Hardy.

  • Please remember plants are living and the appearance of the plants will change with the seasons.
  • During the winter some plants loose the leaves, some die back to the soil, some will look happy and some will look terrible.
  • Don't panic this is normal and your plant will look great during the growing season.
  • Our plants are grown outside to give the hardiest plants possible.
  • Our plants are usually supplied in a 2/3litre sized pot.
  • Not sure what to expect? Ask us if you are unsure.

Pot Size: Usually supplied in a 2/3 litre pot. If this changes we will inform you before we deliver the plants to you.

Plant Heights: Plant heights vary depending on the season, the batch they are picked from and the type of plant.

Delivery: Please see our delivery page for plant delivery details.

Many of our plants are grown outside making hardier plants which will perform better in your garden. During the season some plant leaves can be damaged but do not worry in spring these leaves will soon be replaced with fresh new growth produced by your hard grown plant.

We try to keep our plant list up to date but please note that at some points during the season we may run out of certain varieties.

All our plants are grown with the utmost care; with a little attention and loving care when planting they will grow to be the perfect specimen.

Here is what to do:-
On arrival unwrap you plant/s immediately taking care not to damage any branches. After its long journey your plant may be thirsty and need a drink, so stand in a bucket of water for a couple of hours (don't leave too long) out of the sun and sheltered, but especially frost free. Plant as soon as possible by removing the plant pot. If the roots have formed a dense mat at the bottom of the pot or have curled around the bottom then either cut the curled roots with a sharp knife or pull away the dense mat of roots. Be careful not to disturb the rest of the root ball, this action will encourage the roots to re-grow into the fresh planting soil.
Dig a hole twice the width of the pot and slightly deeper. Fork over the bottom of the planting hole to allow water to drain through and backfill part of the hole with suitable planting compost or some organic manure mixed with some of the removed topsoil. Keep watering every couple of days until established.


Part 2

2012-11-13 08:39:45 by Nurseryman75

In North America, the Smooth Sumac (R. glabra) and the Staghorn Sumac (R. typhina) are sometimes used to make a beverage termed "sumac-ade," "Indian lemonade" or "rhus juice". This drink is made by soaking the drupes in cool water, rubbing them to extract the essence, straining the liquid through a cotton cloth and sweetening it. Native Americans also used the leaves and drupes of the Smooth and Staghorn Sumacs combined with tobacco in traditional smoking mixtures.
Species including the Fragrant Sumac (R. aromatica), the Littleleaf Sumac (R. microphylla), the Skunkbush Sumac (R. trilobata), the Smooth Sumac and the Staghorn Sumac are grown for ornament, either as the wild types or as cultivars


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