Fragrant sumac edible

Fragrant sumac edible

Rhus glabra L., Rhus hirta (L.) and Rhus aromatica Ait. By Adam Benfer Smooth, Staghorn, and Fragrant sumac are three of the most common species of Rhus , which not only resembled each other, but were used similarly. The sumacs are members of the Anacardiaceae (or Cashew Family), like cashews, mangos, and a few common poisonous species. Although they are close cousins of poison ivy, poison oak, and poison sumac, they have notably different appearances. All of these poisonous relatives …

Fragrant Sumac cultivars

Fragrant Sumac cultivars

In North America, the Smooth Sumac (R. glabra) and the Staghorn Sumac (R. typhina) are sometimes used to make a beverage termed sumac-ade,Indian lemonade or rhus juice . This drink is made by soaking the drupes in cool water, rubbing them to extract the essence, straining the liquid through a cotton cloth and sweetening it. Native Americans also used the leaves and drupes of the Smooth and Staghorn Sumacs combined with tobacco in traditional smoking mixtures. Species including …

Fragrant Sumac Native

Fragrant Sumac Native

This fragrant sumac was growing on the Woodland Walk ,a pedestrian walkway running through U. Penn s campus in West Philadelphia. This photo was taken just east of 38th street,on the south side of the path. This plant is a native plant,and I was pleased to see it growing here. Fragrant sumac is an interesting plant to me. For one,its aroma is fascinatingit is unlike anything else. It is a smell that I would describe as eminently pleasing,but something that I would find it hard …

Fragrant Sumac (Rhus aromatica)

Fragrant Sumac (Rhus aromatica)

This species is native to North America north of Mexico. Allergenicity: Fragrant Sumac (Rhus aromatica) is a mild allergen. Pollination: Occurs in following seasons depending on latitude and elevation: Spring to Summer. Angiosperm - Flowering Dicot: Plants in this group have two embryonic leaves (dicotyledons). Examples of dicotyledons are beans, buttercups, oaks, sunflowers, etc. Shrub: A woody plant smaller than a tree, and usually with several stems from the same root. Perennial: …

Fragrant Sumac Fruit

Fragrant Sumac Fruit

Fragrant sumac Anacardiaceae Aiton symbol: RHAR4 Leaf: Alternate, 3 large toothed leaflets, 3 to 5 inches long, terminal leaflet short-stalked, dull dark green above, paler below, fragrant odor when crushed. Flower: Quite small, greenish yellow, in small round clusters; appearing in late spring to early summer. Fruit: Round cluster of reddish brown, fuzzy drupes, each 1/4 inch across, ripen in mid to late summer. Twig: Slender, brown, finely fuzzy, buds small and yellowish brown …

Fragrant Sumac flowers

Fragrant Sumac flowers

It is usually a surprise to find Fragrant Sumac (Rhus aromatica) blooming in the early spring in the Piedmont of North Carolina. It is a relatively rare plant in the Falls Lake area and generally occurs in small, fragmented populations. The shrub itself is low-lying and the flowers begin to bloom before the foliage appears. The small clusters of tiny yellow flowers can be difficult to spot against the dead leaves of the forest floor. As the bloom progresses, the leaves begin to …

Fragrant Sumac Growing Conditions

Fragrant Sumac Growing Conditions

Being a native plant doesn’t mean that the plant cannot also be invasive. I consider a native plant to be invasive if it becomes established in a desired ecosystem and has the ability to replace the existing plant complex with something else. The invasive designation is based on management goals. This means that a single species can be both a desirable native plant and an invasive plant depending upon where it is found at Blue Jay Barrens. A good example of this is the Fragrant …

Fragrant Sumac Rhus aromatica Gro-Low

Fragrant Sumac Rhus aromatica Gro-Low

Mention “sumac” in some circles and the word “poison” often comes up. Try it sometime. It doesn’t help when you’re discussing Aromatic Sumac and someone points out the distinctive trifoliate leaves and shouts, “See! Poison Ivy! Same thing!” “I was once walking the woods with a man and he saw a paper cup down in the base of an aromatic sumac bush. He is a neat and conscientious man, and he couldn’t abide the litter. ‘Why would someone throw trash into a clump of poison ivy?’ he …

Fragrant Sumac in winter

Fragrant Sumac in winter

For those of us enduring long periods of dormancy in our seasonal landscapes, winter bones help to keep our outdoor environments lively and inviting. Structures popping out of the snow and forms drizzled in frost create artistic objects that we may gaze upon and enjoy during the coldest days. For no matter the season, and even without the benefit of green adornments, our gardens can be incredibly beautiful and interesting with the simple addition of living framework. Andrew Wyeth …