Fragrant sumac berries

Fragrant sumac berries

Lemonade is a major staple in our household over the summer months. For a special treat, we make lemonade without lemon juice -- we brew it from lemony sumac berries. There are actually several varieties of sumac in our area. All get extremely distinctive clusters of dark red, hairy berries in the late summer. And they all have pinnate leaves (multiple leaflets on a stem form the larger leaf) that turn gorgeous shades of red to purple in the fall. Rhus typhina, staghorn sumac …

Fragrant sumac leaves

Fragrant sumac leaves

Google Plant Images Rhus aromatica ( Gro-low Fragrant Sumac ) Spreading, low-growing, vigorous, deciduous shrub with smooth hairless branches. Grows to 2 1/2 feet tall and up to 8 feet wide. Leaves are 3-palmate, aromatic, to 4 inches in length. Leaflets are glossy, toothed, obvate, green, turning brilliant reddish-orange in the fall. Small yellow flowers are in upright conical panicles to 3/4 inches long, followed by red, round fruit. Withstands poor, exposed conditions and …

Fragrant Sumac Gro-Low

Fragrant Sumac Gro-Low

/Common Image Description Price Rhus typhina Tiger Eyes Tiger Eyes Sumac Wow! A big departure from the typical staghorn sumac. This striking foliage plant offers a long season of interest with deeply-cut, almost lacy leaves. The new growth starts out a vivid chartreuse, but soon changes to a bright yellow with fuzzy deep pink leaf stems. It remains that color throughout the growing season, without burning even in full sun. In autumn the plants turn a brilliant scarlet-orange …

Fragrant Sumac plants

Fragrant Sumac plants

Sumac (genus ), any of certain species of shrubs and small trees belonging to the cashew family (Anacardiaceae), native to temperate and subtropical zones. All sumacs have a milky or resinous sap, which in a few species can cause a contact dermatitis. Used in the past as a source of dyes, medicines, and beverages, sumacs are now valued as ornamentals, soil binders, and cover plants. The sumacs grown for landscape use display a graceful habit, spectacular fall colour, or colourful …

Fragrant sumac smell

Fragrant sumac smell

Latin Name: Rhus aromatica Other Common Names: Lemon sumac, sweet-scented sumac, polecat bush, aromatic sumac, skunk-bush sumac, three-leaf sumac Native to: Eastern North America USDA Zones: 4-8 Height: 2-8 tall Exposure: Full sun to part shade As the species and common names suggest, this plant has a scent. Specifically, the leaves and twigs smell like citrus if you crush them. The berries can be used to make a lemonade-like drink. Fragrant sumac looks a lot like its relative …

Fragrant sumac poisonous

Fragrant sumac poisonous

A thicket-forming shrub, with branches ascending or lying on the ground. Leaves alternate, compound with three leaflets, leaflets lacking stalks; terminal leaflet 2–2 inches long, short stalked, egg-shaped, tip pointed to rounded, margin lobed or coarsely toothed, lower edge lacking teeth; foliage fragrant when crushed. Bark dark brown, smooth on young stems, becoming cracked later; pores prominent. Twigs slender, flexible, brown, hairy, becoming smooth later. Flowers late March–April …

Fragrant sumac in Nebraska

Fragrant sumac in Nebraska

From my set entitled ‘Sumac” In my collection entitled “The Garden” From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Sumac (also spelled sumach) is any one of approximately 250 species of flowering plants in the genus Rhus and related genera, in the family Anacardiaceae. The dried berries of some species are ground to produce a tangy purple spice often used in juice. Sumacs grow in subtropical and warm temperate regions throughout the world, especially in North America. Sumacs are shrubs …

Fragrant sumac cuttings

Fragrant sumac cuttings

A branch from a wilting fragrant sumac tree (Rhus aromatica Aiton) in an established ornamental planting was submitted to the Plant Disease Diagnostic Laboratory in 1994. The branch exhibited dark brown streaks in the sapwood. Fusarium oxysporum Schlechtend.:Fr. was subsequently isolated from the discolored wood. To confirm pathogenicity, 2-year-old potted sumacs (0.5 to 1 m high)—fragrant, skunkbrush (R. trilobata Nutt. ex Torr. & A. Gray), smooth (R. glabra L.), and …