Herbaceous Perennial Life Cycle

Foxglove, Digitalis purpurea, has been grown in gardens for many years. It is a biennial, growing as a basal rosette the first year, sending up a flowering stalk the second yearBy definition, annuals are plants that complete their lifecycle in a year. They add masses of color to a landscape in the form of blossoms and sometimes foliage as in the case of Coleus (Solenostemon scutellariodes). Annuals can be planted in containers, hanging baskets, on trellises or directly in a garden bed, and many, such as pot marigold (Calendula), bachelor's buttons (Centaurea cyanus), and poppies (Papaver species), will self-sow for more plants next year. Great for borders, containers or mixed in with leafy perennials such as hostas (Hosta species) or lamb's ears (Stachys byzantina), annuals are easy to grow and maintain, and they bring color and texture to a landscape throughout the season.

Dicentra exima, or fringed bleeding heart is one example of a perennial flowerBiennials

Foxglove, Digitalis purpurea, has been grown in gardens for many years. It is a biennial, growing as a basal rosette the first year, sending up a flowering stalk the second year

Biennials require a little more patience than annuals or perennials, but the results are worth the wait. Biennials usually require two growing seasons in order to complete their lifecycle. Be aware that biennials produce foliage and roots the first year, but do not bloom or produce fruit until the second year - a point to be emphasized when planning a landscape. After the second year, some biennials will die while others will self-sow, creating new plants for the following season. Some popular biennials are foxglove (Digitalis), hollyhocks (Alcea), sweet William (Dianthus barbatus), and Canterbury bells (Campanula medium).

Perennials

Dicentra exima, or fringed bleeding heart is one example of a perennial flower

Perennials are usually long-lived plants that have the distinct honor of being the backbone of any garden. Many are relatively hardy and require only minimal care such as minor pruning and watering throughout the growing season. Perennials can be easily propagated by division, allowing gardeners the opportunity to change their garden design every few years with little investment beyond time and effort.


Blue Dick

2008-04-09 08:24:22 by --


A.K.A.: Dichelostemma capitatum
Blue Dick is an herbaceous perennial growing from an underground corm to a height of as much as 60 cm. It has 2–3 leaves which are 10–40 cm long. The inflorescence is head- or umbel-like, and dense. It usually contains 2 to 15 flowers, which have a blue, blue-purple, pink-purple, or white perianth. The flower tube is 3–12 mm and is narrowly cylindrical to campanulate. Flowers have six fertile stamens, deeply notched, lanceolate, white, angled inward, slightly reflexed at tip, with outer filaments wider at the base


Nope, herbaceous flowering plant

2012-05-06 19:58:43 by -

The banana plant is the largest herbaceous flowering plant.[4] The plants are normally tall and fairly sturdy and are often mistaken for trees, but their main or upright stem is actually a pseudostem that grows 6 to 7.6 metres (20 to 24.9 ft) tall, growing from a corm. Each pseudostem can produce a single bunch of bananas. After fruiting, the pseudostem dies, but offshoots may develop from the base of the plant. Many varieties of bananas are perennial.


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