Golden Spotted Dead Nettle

Golden Spotted Dead Nettle

that solves landscape problems and perks along quietly and reliably without any help from us. (We have a big property, and there are plenty of gardens, not to mention the greenhouse and container plantings, that are screaming for attention.) Groundcovers are landscape problem solvers extraordinaire. They’ll grow in the (formerly) barren shade under trees, fill in around stones in a path, define beds and borders so even non-gardeners can recognize them, and even create a tidy foundation bed along those dark, damp sides of buildings where the only color previously came from patches of green slime. Groundcovers are unifiers, tying disparate areas together. They can make a yard look tidy and serene.

Groundcovers can also be thugs. The very qualities we love about them—their unassuming independence, hardy self-reliance, and tendency to spread quickly and fill in barren spaces—can make them nightmares if you choose the wrong plants. Pachysandra and lily of the valley, for example, will do everything in their power to overrun their designated areas and swamp any plants in their path. English ivy will not only cover over other plants but, kudzu-like, take over trees and buildings as well. And don’t get our friend Ben started on that horror, variegated Bishop’s weed (aegopodium). Buyer beware!

Our favorite, most ornamental, and best-behaved groundcover is lamium (Lamium maculatum), which has the unfortunate common name of “spotted dead nettle.” (Sounds like a plague disease, doesn’t it?) It’s a mint relative—it’s no coincidence that the mint family is called Lamiaceae—as you can tell if you feel the stem. (This is actually a cool way to tell if any plant is in the mint family: if it is, the stems will feel square.) And like other mints, it spreads by creeping stems that root where they touch the ground to form new plants. But in the case of lamium, that’s a good thing. It will spread slowly to form a beautiful, well-behaved groundcover, typically 6 to 12 inches tall with small, ornamental leaves and sprays of miniature snapdragon-like flowers. And lamium is made for the shade—its silver-centered, silver, or gold foliage literally lights up the dark areas under trees and in other shady spots.

Never heard of lamium, you say? Our friend Ben begs to differ. If you live where it’s hardy—in USDA Zones 3-8—you may even be growing it right now. But you’re probably more familiar with some of its cultivars, like ‘White Nancy’ or ‘Beacon Silver’, than with the species itself. We love and grow many of the cultivars here at Hawk’s Haven. ‘Shell Pink’, with its soft pink flowers, is a special favorite. ‘White Nancy’, with white flowers and green-edged silver foliage, will add sophistication to any setting. And if you want to get an “Ohmigod, what’s that plant?!” reaction from fellow plant enthusiasts, ‘Anne Greenaway’ will fill that bill, with purple flowers borne over leaves that combine yellow, olive and mint green, and silver. Yowza!


"Onto better topics"

2007-04-30 09:27:02 by potpourri

Yeah, too many examples and pissy things go on that were bad enough at the time, so am not in the mood to rehash this Monday morning!
Yeah plants are always better the second time around. I'm surprised you didn't get more from the chamomile. It's an annual that self seeds like crazy. I only brought one with me to the new place from the apartment, because I know this time next year, there'll be a colony of cham seedlings around this one parent. I kept some of mostly everything in pots so they were easy to move. But some things I had to unearth and repot, and a few really didn't like it, like motherwort, because they were in full bloom when I did it


You might also like:

red dead redemption: Undead …
red dead redemption: Undead …
Red Dead Undead Nightmare Unicorn …
Red Dead Undead Nightmare Unicorn …
Red Dead Redemption - …
Red Dead Redemption - …

DALY: Use care when planting around septic drainfields  — Gwinnettdailypost.com
Shallow rooted annual and perennial herbaceous plants can be planted closer to the drain fields since they do not have invasive roots. Turfgrass can be grown over the drain field and is beneficial since it helps hold the soil in place.

old-print Botany Plants C1902 Red Dead-Nettle Lamium Flowers
Home (old-print)
  • Special indroductory offer
  • Original old antique victorian print, not a modern reproduction
  • 100% Satisfaction Guarantee
  • Size and details in description below, Email for any missing image or description
  • Shipped WORLDWIDE next day, AIRMAIL from head office in Scotland allow 15/21 days for delivery
Stinging Nettle 2 (Butterfly Host …
Stinging Nettle 2 (Butterfly Host …
Red Dead s Undead: Flying Butterfly …
Red Dead's Undead: Flying Butterfly …

Related posts: